Article: The Rise of People Living Alone Has Led to More Sustainable Cities


Whatever you want to call people living alone — some go with solos, others singletons — the fact is there’s a lot more of them than there used to be. In 1950, solos accounted for about 9 percent of all U.S. households; today that figure is roughly 28 percent. As sociologist Eric Klinenberg points out in his 2012 book Going Solo, one in seven American adults now lives alone, and the trend toward solitary living is truly global:

For the first time in human history, great numbers of people — at all ages, in all places, of every political persuasion — have begun settling down as singletons.

Solos may settle down in all places, but the places they seem to prefer most are central cities. That’s significant, says Devajyoti Deka of the Alan M. Voorhees Transport Centre at Rutgers, because when it comes to housing and travel preferences, solos tend to live more sustainable lifestyles. The more sustainable people move into cities, the more sustainable those cities are likely to become.

“If solos continue to grow, even from cross-sectional data it appears that cities will be more sustainable,” says Deka.

via The Rise of People Living Alone Has Led to More Sustainable Cities – Eric Jaffe – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted by KWB wandering among the borderlands of the Ether.

 

2 comments

  1. Yeah, I saw an article on this. It makes sense from a certain perspective. As a husband and father of two, it can be more challenging to live sustainably. At times I feel like I’m herding cats.

    I have friends who do a remarkably wonderful job of it, but from my perspective it can be hard. At the same time, there are more opportunities to make good choices, from how we make lunch in the morning, to the kinds of vacations we take as a family.

    Then I think of the Duggars. 19, for crying out loud, what’s wrong with them!

    1. I can understand that feeling of herding cats having been a kind of den father to a house of Millennials.

      Yeah… The Duggars obviously have a commitment to something, but not sure what.

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